Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?

As we look to this weekend as a very traveled and celebrated holiday, let us remember why we celebrate Memorial Day and what it is really about.

Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering the people who died while serving in the country’s armed forces. It is observed every year on the last Monday of May, and it was originally called “Decoration Day” and began being celebrated after the American Civil War in 1868. The name of the holiday was changed to Memorial Day around the time of World War I and then in 1968 Congress signed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act of 1968, which mandated that Memorial Day would be one of four holidays observed on a Monday (the other three are George Washington’s birthday, Labor Day and Columbus Day). 

This week, Congress passed the VA MISSION Act, which includes a provision to authorize VA Provider Agreements for long term and post-acute care providers, an initiative which has been the focus of our efforts for decades that will help remove some of existing red tape that may prevent providers from being able to provide care or offering the option to veterans who need both nursing center care and home and community-based services. It is expected that President Trump will sign it before Memorial Day.

So while flags are placed on gravesites of those who gave their lives for our freedoms, children will frolic in parks, the smell of barbeque will be eminent….let us all take a moment to remember all of our Veterans across this country who sacrificed for our freedoms. We salute you, we honor you and we thank all Veterans for their service!